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, alienation and how to protect ourselves going forward. don't go away. is our business. we've reduced taxes and lowered costs to save businesses more than two billion dollars to grow jobs, cut middle class income taxes to the lowest rate in sixty years, and we're creating tax free zones for business startups. the new new york is working creating tens of thousands of new businesses, and we're just getting started. to grow or start your business visit thenewny.com >>> we are back with our expert panel. philip mudd in washington, i want to start with you and pick up what bret stevens was talking about. there seems to be a pattern here, which is if you look at the london bombings, they seem to resemble this one in this sense. second generation, first generation immigrant but clearly almost always muslim immigrants. something goes wrong in their assimilation and that is a trigger that puts them on the path to radicalization. when you were in the cia you must have been studying these london bombers, for example. do you think this is something to make 0 of that. >> a better example in terms of wha
,000 people arrested each year for marijuana-related offenses. if we tax currently illegal drugs, we could bring in more than $46 billion. two states, colorado and washington, are trying to end the war on drugs by doing what was said long ago. legalize it. warrick wants to allow it to sold and taxed in a way that monitors how alcohol is sold and taxed. it is a little more complicated than that because of a little thing call the federal government. and he is tasked with ill plemting the new law, new law a professor of public policy at ucla and author of "marijuana cost of abuse, cost of control." welcome, mark. you're advising washington state on how to implement their new law. what are you doing? what are you advising? such that the law is implemented and people behave in a way that is responsible? and is not about we want more people to get high but we don't want people who are committing nonviolent offenses to be crimin criminalized? >> right. we don't want hundreds of millions of dollars in washington state going to revenues. i'm not sure what did the report you just quoted, but anybody
to have the same enthusiasm for paying taxes for the education of its college students today than it had during the cold war. >> anybody else? back in the red shirt in the middle here. >> one of the kingpins of hollywood, more behind the seasons, was lou wasserman who seemed to helped his forces to some political efforts. what was his leanings? was he considered to be a lefty, righty, or just a pragmatist. >> the question is about lou wasserman and his political lengs. -- political leanings. richard? >> lou was seniorman was essentially a man defeated to the welfare of universal pictures. that's what he did and how he defined himself. it seems to me that wasserman was in a certain sense value neutral so long as whatever was happening worked to the benefit of his studio and his enterprise, and it was a vast enterprise by the time it was -- it reached full maturity. i don't think he was -- i don't think he was evil man. he was just a guy really tending to business in a very, very, i must say, very effective way. there's no question in my mind at least, that he was the weeding ontrip -- the
. and then asa to close it off. >> yes, thank you, jim. the tax force says -- the task force says in our report all societies behave differently under stress. at those times they may even take actions that conflict with their essential character and values. and that's what we did here. of we were under stress, and we took actions that conflict with who we are. who we are called to be and who we have committed to be. and then we spent about ten years not being willing to face the truth about that. often by covering what happened with euphemisms and an awful lot of state secrets. so i believe that our detainee task force has functioned as a kind of truth commission, revealing where we strayed from our values by shining the light of investigation and analysis onto the problem in the open that the next time we're under that kind of stress we do not go down the same road. and it has been an honor to serve on this panel. >> thank you, dave. nick? >> very little, just in terms of new things, everyone here has discussed the general contours of the report which is the most important thing. there are som
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4